Baroque, Rococo Style Make for a Luxury Bedroom

Baroque and Rococo decor are popular styles, and bedrooms are one of the places in your home where these eras of design can shine. The characteristics of Baroque furniture and Rococo elements are perfect for a space meant to be opulent, relaxing and luxurious. Curving lines, ample embellishment and sumptuous fabrics, which are typical of these styles, make a bedroom extra special.

Not sure about the difference between Baroque and Rococo?  In short, Baroque refers to a period spanning from the 17th century until the beginning of the 18th century and is epitomized by Louis the XIVth and Versailles. It is opulent and a heavier style – more “serious.” Rococo is often considered a subset of the Baroque era, sometimes even called late Baroque. It is typically lighter, more feminine and whimsical. Giving a bedroom a touch of Baroque or Rococo is easy to do. Personal preference will drive how much of the look is appropriate for you.

The first element of these styles to consider is gold. Because wood was always a prominent feature in Baroque furniture, gilding was often applied and the ornamentation was almost always done in gold. This bedroom features several telling characteristics, such as the extravagant gold ornamentation atop the tufted headboard. While that is decidedly Baroque, the lavish bedding is more Rococo because it is made from silk.

Fabrics in the Rococo era were more likely to include silk.

Obviously Baroque in style, this bedroom is indeed grand and over-the-top.  An ornate headboard is further enhanced with lavish draping, flanked by wall panels that include generous embellishments of several kinds. Gilded and ornamented nightstands have shorter legs and a more bombe shape, which is of the Baroque era.

The feminine painted floral pattern on the furniture hints at Rococo.
Take one look at the bed and there is no doubt that this is a Baroque bedroom.
Ample gilding, paneled walls and generous draping make for a Baroque bedroom with a weighty feeling.

The carved embellishments of this era are amazingly intricate. Baroque style used a great deal of plant life in its ornamentation, including scrolling foliage and garlands of flowers. The masses of scrollwork on the bed, nightstand and dresser are carefully accented with gold.

This is a good example of the more “serious” Baroque furniture with lavish carvings.

Regal is the best way to describe this bedroom, done up in blue and ornately carved furniture. Unassuming wood panels on the wall are a clean backdrop for the intricately inlaid furnishings as well as the lavish, multi-tiered bases under each piece. While the gilding in this room may be nearly non-existent, it still conveys a sense of grandeur.

Although most of the textiles are silk and not heavier fabrics, the room still falls into the Baroque era.
This Baroque bed has beautiful examples of draping carved garlands of leaves.

Another popular decorative element during the Baroque period was a heraldic crest or a monogram. The kingly bed below and a centerpiece emblem that represents where a crest would likely go. There is no overabundance of carving and the textiles are simple, but it remains a stately Baroque headboard.

Patterned or decorated wall panels behind the bed were common in the Baroque era.

In a modern take on Rococo, an off-white bedroom includes a patterned wall with mirrors, very typical of the period.  However here, the frames have little embellishment and are paired with some empty ones that serve as a modern design element. The bed itself is anchored by headboard in the shape of a shell, a motif very commonly used in Rococo.  In fact, the term Rococo originates with the French word rocaille, which denoted the shell-covered rock work that was used to decorate artificial grottoes, according to Britannica.

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Light ivory silk upholstery is Rococo.

The shell shape is also dominant in this bedroom. It is done in a muted shade of olive but is still very feminine thanks to the frills and frou-frou that decorate the room. The gilded carvings on the bed are floral, the legs of the nightstands are embellished and bedding and lamps are dressed with flowers and ruffles. All together, it’s a Rococo room.

The bench at the end of the bed hides a television screen, showing how a bedroom can be Rococo and still very functional for today.
The headboard and overall look are Rococo, but the nightstands are Baroque.

Baroque features with a masculine twist and clean look come together in a bedroom that is no less lavish. Devoid of gold and heavy embellishments, this bedroom features an upholstered decorative panel on the wall behind the deeply tufted headboard. The sole carved decoration remains in the natural wood color. Modern nightstands with Baroque legs go well with a modern rug and ample pillows in varied fabrics.

A great example of pared-down Baroque style for the modern man.

A similar, more feminine version in the same color palette features a headboard that extends widely, ensconcing two Rococo nightstands. The carved and gilded decorations on the bed are contcentrated at the sides.

This is a great bed if you want to feel regal.

Maybe not totally masculine, but certainly gender-neutral, this modern bedroom borrows a few concepts from the Baroque and Rococo. Deeply raised wall panels and a grand tufted headboard hearken back to the era, but are lacking the traditional gold finishes and embellishments. Paired with contemporary nightstands that have a mirror finish, it is a very current design.

Sticking with neutral colors can keep feminine details from overwhelming.

Another example of a toned-down bedroom that makes use of Baroque and Rococo pieces is this more feminine one. The bed displays a single carved piece at the center, and the textiles are low key. The lamps and floral paintings are Rococo, yet the nightstands are bombe, which is characteristic of Baroque.

Bedside lamps feature plenty of gilding and have a lighter design.

Sometimes a little ornamentation can go a long way.  A rectangular headboard sports a minimalist shape and is decorated with a little bit of gold that is repeated on the otherwise plain nightstand. The only opulent pieces in the entire room are the desk and chair, which is upholstered in a rich red with detailed golden decorations.

Wall panels are not overdone and feature small embellishments.
Similarly, this bedroom uses Rococo style in the nightstands and headboard.

This gorgeous style mash-up combines elements of the Baroque — the gilded headboard adornments — with mirror and wall decoration that is more like Art Deco. The conspicuously Art Deco style bedspread is a vibrant addition to the bedroom and demonstrates how you can make pieces from different eras work together.

Restrained gold decoration in patterns that play upon one another is a good strategy for mixing styles.

Baroque and Rococo styles are mixed in this bedroom done in a sophisticated gray hue. The fabrics and bench are more Rococo while the nightstands have the typical short, squat legs of the Baroque era and the bed is highlighted by an intricately carved middle ornament.

The draped wall behind the bed is extravagant but less serious than an ornamented, paneled wall.

As already mentioned, Rococo style is more feminine and includes many flowers, and this headboard is a good example. The headboard is lighter in style, with many feminine curves and plenty of flora in the embellishments. The nightstand has longer, thinner legs, also indicating that it is a piece of Rococo furniture.

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Simple bedding plays down the ornate style of the headboard.

The same lighter colors of ivory and the totally feminine and frivolous headboard are very Rococo. The silk upholstery, cushions and bedspread are typical of the era’s lighter fabrics, which were influenced by Asia.

The Rococo elements of this bed conjure up the word “boudoir.”
The same can be said for this guest room, which features similar twin beds.

A more modern take on Rococo frivolity is evident in this setting.  The upholstered bed is topped with ornate floral carvings and accented with ribbon of gold throughout. Accompanying furnishings have a touch of gilding.  A pictured are some occasional tables, which originally gained popularity in the Baroque era.  These, however, have the this, slender legs of the Rococo period.

Unmistakably feminine, this red and beige bedroom plays mostly on the Rococo.  A silk tufted headboard with controlled ornamentation features the flowers that are common in this decor style. At the same time, a touch of velvet on the cushions and the bedding echoes the heavier fabrics of the Baroque era. A lighter floral rug and modern ceiling fixtures pull this into a more contemporary version of Rococo.

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The deep red of the wall adds a unique touch to the room.

Also feminine but strictly neutral, an upholstered headboard features silk and a curvaceous frame, but only a modest amount of ornamental trim. The lighter color palette fits in with the Rococo theme.

Adding dainty details like the frilly lamps plays up the feminine nature of the setting,

Known for its often whimsical or frivolous nature, Rococo style bedrooms can be a bit more light-hearted.  The eye is immediately drawn to the funky feet on the bench, along with its unusual tapered shape. While the wall panels sport plenty of ornamentation, it is not gilded and is painted in a light ivory, typical of the style. The tall, leggy nightstands are decorated with asymmetrical designs that coordinate with the bedspread. The blue glass chandelier is also far less serious than the typical lavish baroque piece.

Sparingly used, gold embellishment can still have a great impact.

In a swing back to more traditional Baroque style, a bedroom featuring dark wood, a gilded headboard with embellished tufting evokes a more historical feel. The legs on all the furnishings are characteristically short and squat.

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The darker ivory hues and heavier fabrics are Baroque.

Four poster beds were in fashion in the Baroque era as well. Some were highly decorated, but this more modern version has a lesser amount of embellishment. Instead of a massive carving adorning the bed, a scrollwork piece hangs on the wall. For some, this is a more versatile way to incorporate the Baroque into today’s modern home.  Also, the metallic paint is a softer color than the traditionally heavy yellow gold.

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The highly decorated mirror is more whimsical and of the Rococo style.

This four poster is a modern mix that pulls in elements of the Baroque and Rococo. The pearl-draped chandelier is feminine as are the thin posters of the bed, which does not have a canopy. The wood furniture in the room is definitely from a different time and the elaborate drapes behind the bed add an element of luxury.

More contemporary accessories are used in this space.

Canopy beds are common in kids rooms, particularly for little girls. This one is pink, with some nods to the Rococo.  The regal padded headboard and butterfly details on the nightstands and rug would fit right in with the Rococo era. Moreover, the bedside lamp is a lighthearted version of a birdcage.

It’s possible to adapt elements of Rococo for a kids room.

Achieving a more modern look in a kids room and still using elements of Baroque or Rococo is possible.  This room features wall panels that are straight from the period and all the fixtures and accessories are lighthearted and fun.

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This thoroughly modern room has historic elements if you know how to look for them.

Baroque and Rococo style decor is very distinctive and most people will probably either love it or hate it. However, when elements are used judiciously or in a modernized version, it can appeal to a wider audience. It might be centuries old, but it is still sought out, reproduced and used in today’s modern homes. And, thanks to the opulent and luxurious feel of these styles, the bedroom is a prime space for incorporating Barque and Rococo pieces.

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